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powerful navy, and that that navy would be charged with maintaining the freedom of those sea lanes. we had, of course, to be concerned as to whether there would be a challenge for that. we observed that the rise and shine has more energy needs for more energy than they can produce themselves, and to maintain the economic growth which they believe is essential. we observed that the south china sea is a potential source of energy supplies for china and that there is a contention among the nations in that region as to where the ownership and rights of access are to the south china sea. and this is conceivable that china might seek to reestablish its claim there by military coercion and that could lead them into a confrontation with the united states' desire to maintain free access. the best way of avoiding that military conflict is what we should see because the military conflict with china would be catastrophic for both nations, indeed for the whole region. so, we want to avoid that. i believe the best way of avoiding that is by maintaining a -- continuing to maintain a strong naval
climb into the trees and when the navy get in there just about at the top of the trees. that's what we found. the cost was close to 30 billion u.s. dollars. how we organize, well, we have something similar that you have. we have the national emergency office under the internal affair minister and they have offices in the different counties, in the different places in chile this emergency office request aid directly to the joint chief of staff and joint chief of staff to the army, navy or air force and then we move the pieces to put the aid where they need it. the scenario, the beginning when we face this was the same thing we are talking about in this seminar. the necessity was access because everything was, the delivery was absolutely hampered because of the roads so we have to clean it. water, food, electricity and communications. another need at that time to do that is field hospital generators, housing, sat coms, purifying water systems and mobile bridges. so the force was at the beginning just to distribute the aid and at the end start doing law enforcement when the govern
which we coordinate with cal fire and the navy we have annual exercise and we hit that every springtime prior to the fire season. i think what's also, it's important to remember that although it was stressed, the military members are members of the community as well so let's not forget that as far as active duty. although we're transient in nature, sometimes we're in deployment, many of us are home owners and we live in that community. we are part of that community as well. just like the guard, we have an interest in protecting our friends and neighbors. sustainment is, it's important to us and we'll maintain it especially on the region side. we're able to have these long-standing relationships while the operating force side goes forward and supports the on-going efforts, we are able to stay back here and sustain those relationships. >> just to follow on that, the navy squadrons that provide fire fighting capability are a combination of active and reserve components. one benefit of reserve components is more longevity is pilots in the squadrons. you may have people who have been th
speaker will come up at that point. thank you again. he heads the baur row of medicine for the navy. i lacked at his bay oh in the program, educated in georgia and he's had a great career in the navy commanding several hospitals, winning several awards and his most recent command was as the commander of walter reed, and i was so glad that he was here to hear the panel that we had with our medical peer to peer exercise. and he's going to talk to us now about navy medicine. with that, please help me welcome vice admiral matthew nathan. (applause). >> thank you, general, very much. well, it's a pleasure here and i'm honored to be able to speak in front of such a distinguished audience. secretary schultz, mrs. schultz, pleasure it see you and you lend tremendous gaffe tas to this program. general spees, distinguished flag officers, general officers and mostly everybody here who is in the readiness business, i am honored to be speaking to a group of people and that would include i think everybody in this hanger deck who is part of that cadre of individuals who when bad things happen and
because soon i'll be headed over to treasure island, a former navy firefighting school, we'll have that facility about 14 years and we'll be welcoming 40 members from the u.s. marine corps, 20 members from the u.s. navy, 10 members the u.s. coast guard, where we will then partner with them and cross train them and use our techniques, reaching technical rescue and high and low rescue being demonstrated in display. we will also be having some of our u.s. navy personnel on ride-alongs with members on our ambulances, fire engines and trucks to continue with our cross training. so, it gives me great pride to be here to continue to serve as the fire chief, to welcome the military, and to say thank you to all of you. here's to an enjoyable fun-filled busy weekend. all the best, and thank you for your service. (applause) >> i wanted chief to tell you about that training. we first did it in 2010, search and rescue which we knew was a problem in haiti in the earth wake in the recovery. and like they say in san francisco, the fire department, we know how to do it, but when the big earthquake
in the marine corps is similar to the navy. we have the installation, the regional installation command and also partners with the operational foresite. we allow the operational foresight, we maintain those but then we coordinate, cooperate, with the operational foresight once the call comes in for support. so we're able to do that obviously through memorandum of understandings and we have agreements and our wing operating orders allow for the fact the operational control, at least under operational response, maintains with the operators. the third aircraft wing maintains operational control but we send our operatives out to be controlled by the civic sight. we're comfortable with that and that's matured a lot in the last couple years. >> talked a lot about command and control and agreements and moving resources. one other question that came up yesterday we were discussing yesterday is how do communications occur specifically with regard to when we start talking about air ops and moving air resources around, how do we ensure that we have that interoperatability that we discussed so much yes
of command are critical in anything that we do. what better way to showcase what our united states navy and our marine corps, our sea-going services, bring to the table in an emergency response, but recognize that they also have another mission to do, macon island just came off a 7-month deployment, this is an era when we're pivoting to the pacific. the ring of fire is also in the pacific. over 35,000 on average fatalities a year over 35 billion dollars worth of damage and we see that year in and year out with tsunamis of catastrophic proportions. today the coast guard is dealing with the debris from that tsunami as it comes ashore here in the state waters as well. just it close on admire beeman's remarks, i think it's critical not just the work here at seminar but over a cup of coffee exchanging business cards because at the end of the day it's the partnerships that mufrt endure at time of crisis. thank you to the macon island for this show of force during this third fleet week. >> i'd like to bring up the mayor of the great city and county of san francisco. what a difference he's ma
of world war ii the royal navy was the world's biggest navy. also was irrelevant. it was powerful but they didn't understand aircraft carriers, they underestimated submarines and they thought battleships were still central to maritime operation. the royal navy does nothing worth remembering in world war ii. is a total drain on the british. when mitt romney was talking about the size of the navy during one of the debate, i thought you want to read paul kennedy year. just because we have a big powerful navy doesn't mean it is the right navy. what you want of a relevant force? april and force down the road is going to look very different than it does today. but i think the place to begin with pretty severe budget cuts that make people stop and think. >> we have had so many great questions and i know we can go all night but we only have time for one more and tom will talk to a lot of you individually as well. you, sir. >> perfect segue. i'm a navy captain of the naval academy. also co-founder of a forum to study warfare and wondering if you could comment or everything what you said ab
think going through this that the navy and the marine corps, we're used to being in charge whenever we show up and we're not going to be in this situation. i think it's important for us to understand that and we do and i think we, if we were employed in this certainly would understand that particular chain of command and would be able to fit right in and execute as required by the local situation. >> let me reiterate that the local authorities need to know that the emergency managers, the first responders, are there to be in charge to run things in their local disaster. everyone else that rolls in behind are there to enable them to do that, to manage to get back to normal so all the forces that roll in can finally leave. the emergency managers need to remain in control, they need to be situationally aware, they need to be in communicate with their forces, they need to understand what assets can become available as they need them. again, they are primed, they have to be active and in place and everyone, everything everyone can provide to them, will help in their efforts to contain the
piece of work by the navy. it turned around the attitudes of niche a toward the united states. it was a the kind of building block we look for in an economic and security commons. just as when we in san francisco see not only what the military can bring to the party and help us with, not only how we can interact with the military, but also we say to ourselves, it's also up to us to do everything we can for ourselves. we're not kind of an outfit, it's easier for them to collaborate with us. so, all of these things are important to us as we have these exercises. so, i say this is a very worthwhile enterprise that will keep going. i tip my hat to my friend mike who really has been leading us in these efforts. and now i say as also the slogan, i guess you call it this morning, maybe it's what the navy says. i think it's a very good phrase. a global force for good. that's what we've been practicing, a global force for good. thank you. (applause) >> thank you, sir. thank you. thank you very much, sir. (applause) >> and for all of you, tomorrow we're going to have the former secretar
of going over with traditional forces and being around americans. we would live with two marines, one navy corpsman -- three marines, one navy corpsman and 80 afghans on a base. you want to talk about a complete culture shock, i got one. we did everything with these afghans from eating to drinking to building volleyball courts to mission planning to hearing about their stories of their lives. and it really helped us become a solid unit, and we learned to depend on one another and rely on one another. and i want to talk about the afghans later on because of what the current events are. but i have to tell you one of the best lessons i think this taught me was, is not to look at the world and not to judge people by their religion, their skin color, their financial status or anything like that, but to accept them for who they are. because, you know, i have to tell you, i'm guilty of having what i like to call the small town complex. coming from a small town, i've got it. that's where you think your world's only this big and that's how it is because that's how it was taught. i'm 4, and i know t
korean navy recovered the debris from a depth of 80 meters. the sill object weighs 32 kilometers, they believe it to be a fuel tank from the first stage of the rocket. it has korean characters for the rocket's name and four holes at the bottom with wiring still in place. defense ministry officials plan to work with experts from the united states to analyze the object's metal composition and possible fuel residue. >>> north korea's rocket launch has set off another round of world condemnation. once again, much of the attention is on china. the north's most influential ally. today on china report, we look at the response from leaders in bejing and what motivates their longstanding relationship with an isolated regime. >> reporter: chinese media were quick to respond to the rocket launch. tv networks ran a news clip using reports by foreign news agencies. but it took a full six hours for the chinese government to issue a formal comment. it was made during the regular press conference of the foreign ministry. >> translator: it's regrettable that north korea went ahead with the launc
. vo: give softest sweaters. just $15. old navy. come fun, come all. >>> you are watching cbs eyewitness news on the cw. >> i don't understand who could hurt innocent children. i don't get that. what did they do to you? >> evil visited this community today. >> i know there is not a parent in america who doesn't feel the same grief that i do. >> an unthinkable horror, new details about the shooter, the guns bought by his mother and the heroes, including the teacher who saved her students by barricading them in a bath room. >> good evening. i am ken. >> the second deadliest shooting in school history. a 20-year-old walked into a school and started shooting. 20 children are among the dead and a crime investigators are only starting to piece together. it happened in newton, connecticut. a quiet suburb 80 miles from new york. >> reporter: i am standing down the street from where sandy hook elementary school is located, where the shooting took place a tragedy that shocked the community, parents and family members are grieving the loss of innocent children and adults in the massacre.
states navy, ultimately serving as an intelligence prefer for admiral burke, chief of naval operations. i would say the navy and admiral burke chose the best person they could for that particular job. .. i was working full-time and attending indiana law school at night and that didn't leave much time for marcia in to enjoy the amenities of indianapolis. but frankly, they were very few to enjoy that particular time. it was then that her newly elect a mayor began a remarkable transformation of indianapolis into it now has become one of the most attract david livable cities in america. as mayor, dick lugar worked carefully with the indiana general assembly, then governor would come to extend the boundaries of the city and merge indianapolis and marion county to provide common essential service is more efficiently, a concept that called unit of. unit of wasn't without conversely because of dick lugar's vision, careful negotiations and decisive action, indianapolis became a model for other cities across the nation. when the law took effect in 1970 indianapolis population rose from 476,000 to 7
, the navy, and the national guard all working with our department of public works figuring out how would they work together. we didn't give them a lot of coaching, we just kind of put them in a tent and said here is your scenario, here's some problems, and we wanted them to work it out and they did. so it was a very successful year. that's what we did as far as the field exercises. next year i don't know what's next, we're going to explore the lessons learned from this one, we've already learned a bunch, they're going to talk about this shortly then learn what are the next scenarios we can challenge people with. it probably won't be the same ones. we are building the institutional relationships and getting beyond the scenario. it's not just about the heavy equipment operators, it's about city of san francisco staff and departments understanding how the military works and giving the military a chance to work with the civilian authority in a non-crisis environment so that when they have to do it anywhere in the world, they've got one extra training day. that's the way we look at it, it'
of the pioneers in figuring that out. if she did not take commissioned steamships or part of the navy you had to figure out, who am i ss and are subject of and to is going to let me into their territory. no one -- see, people really neglect the southern hemisphere because it is so much easier. >> there is no water. howdy you do it? across this chilean. >> well, people have done it sense. the first man to walk around the world does go over australia with a mule. and at that point this is the 20th-century. at that point he could get food and water more easily. but yes, the surface travelers, i must say, are some of the toughest, if not most mean-spirited people in the world, but you have to be that way. i mean, it is hard to do both physically and, i think socially to put yourself at risk constantly like that. it is kind of a bloody minded thing to do i don't sense among people you're going to go off and do it any time soon. maybe so. >> you mentioned the dangers and the -- i guess, what did locals or what are some -- do you have some stories of what the local people, how they reacted to these
american man of their world was william c. whitney, who had been secretary of the navy under grover cleveland. he had also been quite taken with mrs. randolph while he was married, and his wife made a big fuss about it, so that was the end of that. and then his wife died in the late 1880s--early '90s, actually. and so whitney married edith randolph and morgan took up with her best friend, who was a woman named adelaide louisa townsend, who was quite a wonderful person, not as beautiful as edith whitney--edith randolph whitney, but very energetic and full of life and a real match for him in her appreciation of art and travel, and she was sort of a wonderful spirit. i met someone who had actually known her, an older woman who knew her. and also i met--i eventually met her grandson, which was a lot of fun 'cause he could tell me quite a lot about her life and the house that she lived in on park avenue. and he said that park avenue. and he said that there was a special back entrance for mr. morgan and that the children were told to disappear when mr. morgan arrived. i mean, there--beca
could have hired navy s.e.a.l.s to come in and do a better job. they did everything that they were trained and hoped to do. we locked the doors. they have cameras on them. we have security officers. in some cases we have full on police officers in larger schools they have police forces. this was a deranged individual. and he hurt us as a nation. but i think what's also important is to understand that from this tragedy we're going to see that we as a state and as a country are going to come together and make sure that the folks here in newtown get every single thing that we can provide them. we can't get them their children back. but we can let them know that they are loved and supported and we're going to be there for them throughout the holidays and beyond. >> steve, what about the survivors? all the kids that heard and saw things that they will never forget. at what point does their ability to learn, their development, all of that suffer? i mean, can they ever get back to what they were? >> that's the tough part. that's the tough part. no one knows the impact of a tragedy on a ch
from the chilean navy, thank you so much. i learned a lot. we need the kind of input that we got from you, really, and we thank you so much. i would be remiss not to mention the two people that really are responsible for all this. first was lewis loeven. lewis loeven works hours and hours to do this. thank you so much. but the other is because she's committed to make it happen and it's her focus that always to learn from everything that happens, ann koninberg at dem, thank you so much, ann, for everything you do. you had to have a pass to get on the ship. i've asked captain pringle, to get off the ship, i wonder if you can secure the hatch until they fill out their participant form. if you could do that, i would appreciate that. fleet week, we are a neutral convener of the process to improve the relation ships between this global force for good and the local civilian officials. and one of our goals is next time you put up your slide with all those logos on it, general, you are going to have the san francisco fleet week logo on it, too. i look at what we accomplished in 2010, we
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19

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